London Fashion Week 16Arlington

16Arlington

In London, designers embraced the past and looked towards the future, channeling chaos into craftsmanship and darkness into beauty. In celebration of the female body and in recognition of Gen Z preferences, asymmetrical cut outs, bodycon silhouettes, and sheer fabrications emerged.

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Youthful Discord

LFW Youthful Discord

Bethany Williams | Matty Bovan | Preen by Thornton Bregazzi | Vivienne Westwood

Aware of the disconnect in the world around us, London designers channeled chaos into craftsmanship. Inspired by a growing local network of skilled artisans that made the collection titled “The Hands That Heal Us” possible, Bethany Williams’ playful patterns and knits celebrated the power of craft. A similar ode to the global power of fashion, Matty Bovan created a chaotic, yet soulful collection inspired by the “kids who have grown up as immersed in other cultures and feel a need to rebel against their symbols of patriotism.”

Female Gaze

LFW Female Gaze

16Arlington | Nensi Dojaka | Poster Girl | Supriya Lele

“Women’s rights are a very key topic now, and this is bringing about that sense of liberation and on top of that, after the pandemic restrictions, women are more eager to feel sexy and powerful,” said Nensi Dojaka of her Fall 2022 collection. Showcasing what she does best, Dojaka fused lingerie and daywear by layering sheer, strappy materials in celebration of the female body. Asymmetrical cut outs, bodycon dresses, and see-through fabrics were central to London this season as designers championed the female-gaze across the runway.

Dark Fantasy

LFW Dark Fantasy

Simone Rocha | Erdem | David Koma | Bora Aksu

Juxtaposing dark fabrics with softer silhouettes, embellishments, and ruffle details, London designers embraced the darkness of the past as they looked towards the future. Inspired by an old Irish horror legend in which children are turned into swans, Simone Rocha’s collection featured black velvet dresses with sheer midriffs, crystal-adorned knit balaclavas, puff sleeves, and pearl-embellished cat eye makeup. Erdem, David Koma, and Bora Aksu similarly found beauty in darkness. Koma created crystal body armor, while Erdem and Bora Aksu paired mystical details with historical silhouettes.

Body Conscious

David Koma | Nensi Dojaka | Mark Fast | Poster Girl

Embracing every curve with their skin-tight silhouettes, catsuits champion the female body. From the neon pink cut out catsuits at Gen Z-favorite Poster Girl to lingerie-inspired sheer versions at Nensi Dojaka, the catsuit is a symbol of the self-empowered female gaze. Mark Fast channeled his former life as a raver through his catsuits that merged the principles of club dresses and sportswear into one sensual garment that flatters all bodies.

Crushed Effect

LFW Crushed Effect

Edward Crutchley | Dundas | Erdem | Rejina Pyo

Crushed velvet elevated the gothic dressing that took hold of London Fashion Week. At Edward Crutchley, crushed velvet capes and dresses were worn by both men and women, highlighting the gender neutral quality of his designs. Peter Dundasalso presented his interpretation of this heavy, moody fabric, while Erdem relied on hammered silk to underscore the dark tension of his collection.

Don’t miss out on a more in depth analysis of LFW, including trending colors, materials, key items, accessories, beauty looks, and more.

Download the full report here.


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